bug of the day

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I’m impressed that this shot of a Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa) came out using just the zoom on my point-and-shoot camera. The butterfly was resting on a sunny spot about ten feet up on the oak tree.

I’m impressed that this shot of a Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa) came out using just the zoom on my point-and-shoot camera. The butterfly was resting on a sunny spot about ten feet up on the oak tree.

This neat little guy was waiting for me on the door to the shed last weekend. It’s a flat bug, a very appropriate name given the look of him, probably Aradus robustus. Flat bugs typically hide under the bark of trees. Maybe this one came from my wood pile.

This neat little guy was waiting for me on the door to the shed last weekend. It’s a flat bug, a very appropriate name given the look of him, probably Aradus robustus. Flat bugs typically hide under the bark of trees. Maybe this one came from my wood pile.

Found this beautiful Intent Zale (Zale intenta) last night, tucked into a stone wall right under my porch light.

Found this beautiful Intent Zale (Zale intenta) last night, tucked into a stone wall right under my porch light.

This beautiful moth is a Grote’s Sallow (Copivaleria grotei), one of two gorgeous specimens that showed up at the light tonight. A new genus and species for the yard!

This beautiful moth is a Grote’s Sallow (Copivaleria grotei), one of two gorgeous specimens that showed up at the light tonight. A new genus and species for the yard!

I honestly thought this little blip of a moth might have been a spot of bird poop when I first saw it on top of one of my black lights the other night. Turned out to be a Tortricid moth, fairly certain it’s actually Acleris ptychogrammos. Sadly, this species does not seem to have a common name…anyone want to have a go at it?
Update: The pragmatist in me would like to vote for “Fold-line Acleris”…but “Badminton Moth” is so much more fun!

I honestly thought this little blip of a moth might have been a spot of bird poop when I first saw it on top of one of my black lights the other night. Turned out to be a Tortricid moth, fairly certain it’s actually Acleris ptychogrammos. Sadly, this species does not seem to have a common name…anyone want to have a go at it?

Update: The pragmatist in me would like to vote for “Fold-line Acleris”…but “Badminton Moth” is so much more fun!

Apr 9
I went hunting all over the yard this afternoon, looking for things to photograph, and the most interesting creature I found was sitting on my porch screen not three feet from the door I was heading to go back inside.This is a margined carrion beetle, Oiceoptoma noveboracense. It’s an impressive lightning bug mimic, down to the abdomen exposed below the end of the elytra (wing covers).

I went hunting all over the yard this afternoon, looking for things to photograph, and the most interesting creature I found was sitting on my porch screen not three feet from the door I was heading to go back inside.

This is a margined carrion beetle, Oiceoptoma noveboracense. It’s an impressive lightning bug mimic, down to the abdomen exposed below the end of the elytra (wing covers).

Apr 7
The first warm night of the spring brought up a few cutworms out of the lawn. “Cutworm” is just a way of describing the caterpillar of the large yellow underwing, Noctua pronuba, a reference to its habit of feeding on young plants by chewing through them at the base of the stem. Hope this guy left my poor little crocus alone!

The first warm night of the spring brought up a few cutworms out of the lawn. “Cutworm” is just a way of describing the caterpillar of the large yellow underwing, Noctua pronuba, a reference to its habit of feeding on young plants by chewing through them at the base of the stem. Hope this guy left my poor little crocus alone!

Apr 6
Always a sign of spring for me, I was glad to see a Roland’s Sallow (Psaphida rolandi) sitting on top of one of my black lights the other night.

Always a sign of spring for me, I was glad to see a Roland’s Sallow (Psaphida rolandi) sitting on top of one of my black lights the other night.

Apr 5
Here’s another sallow, with a darker and richer coloration than last night’s species. This is straight-toothed sallow, Eupsilia vinulenta, or possibly the as-yet-unnamed-but-looks-very-similar Eupsilia sp. “near sidus”. Some things still need to be figured out with the taxonomy of this genus. Beautiful moth, either way!

Here’s another sallow, with a darker and richer coloration than last night’s species. This is straight-toothed sallow, Eupsilia vinulenta, or possibly the as-yet-unnamed-but-looks-very-similar Eupsilia sp. “near sidus”. Some things still need to be figured out with the taxonomy of this genus. Beautiful moth, either way!

Apr 4
I found at least a dozen of these moths sitting on tree branches and the trunks of saplings when I walked along a trail in my backyard the other night. This one is a Morrison’s sallow, Eupsilia morrisonii.

I found at least a dozen of these moths sitting on tree branches and the trunks of saplings when I walked along a trail in my backyard the other night. This one is a Morrison’s sallow, Eupsilia morrisonii.