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Here are some macros of the eggs laid by that walking stick from earlier in the week. Not the best shots, because these eggs are less than 2mm long, but they did help me id the walking stick as Northern Walkingstick, Diapheromera femorata. I can’t believe the intricacy to these eggs - to the naked eye they looked like solid dark brown specks.

Another really cool BotD find…A couple of us were doing some field work last week and came across a small section of a tiny stream that was simply teeming with hundreds of these little critters, skating across the water at a furious pace. We grabbed a sample for closer inspection. Turns out they were Small Water Striders, Rhagovelia obesa.
This is a most curious-looking bug, with what I’d call an “athletic build” (wide on top, skinny on the bottom) :-). Its middle and back legs are longer than the pair nearest its head, and are adapted for skating on the water surface. The middle legs are split at the end, and if I had a better digicam I might have been able to show you that they actually contain a beautiful “swimming fan.”
Thanks to Brady Richards at bugguide for bringing this to species and Sarah Grubin for the swimming fan info.

Another really cool BotD find…A couple of us were doing some field work last week and came across a small section of a tiny stream that was simply teeming with hundreds of these little critters, skating across the water at a furious pace. We grabbed a sample for closer inspection. Turns out they were Small Water Striders, Rhagovelia obesa.

This is a most curious-looking bug, with what I’d call an “athletic build” (wide on top, skinny on the bottom) :-). Its middle and back legs are longer than the pair nearest its head, and are adapted for skating on the water surface. The middle legs are split at the end, and if I had a better digicam I might have been able to show you that they actually contain a beautiful “swimming fan.”

Thanks to Brady Richards at bugguide for bringing this to species and Sarah Grubin for the swimming fan info.

@kidthoughts and @mothsandmantids were looking for moths (especially cute ones ;-)), so here ya go!
Was checking my raspberry bushes for any interesting critters the other night when I found this cute little moth butt peeking out at me. Turned out to belong to a moth known as The Herald (<i>Scoliopteryx libatrix</i>). I knew this species was attractive from overhead, but the pattern on the underside of the wing is actually quite lovely too.

@kidthoughts and @mothsandmantids were looking for moths (especially cute ones ;-)), so here ya go!

Was checking my raspberry bushes for any interesting critters the other night when I found this cute little moth butt peeking out at me. Turned out to belong to a moth known as The Herald (<i>Scoliopteryx libatrix</i>). I knew this species was attractive from overhead, but the pattern on the underside of the wing is actually quite lovely too.

Could we see a picture of the eggs?

Anonymous

I will try to post a pic of the eggs tomorrow. They look like little flax seeds.

A *HUGE* treat yesterday - went outside to look around and found a big green walking stick on the side of the house. Then went outside last night with the dog and found another walking stick in our raspberry bushes! Here they are, photographed on my walking stick for Meta purposes only (have to give credit to Mr. BotD for that one ;-)).
The smaller brown one was female and laid half a dozen eggs while I had her in the container. I returned both walking sticks to the woods this morning, now I just need to figure out a safe place for those eggs&#8230;

A *HUGE* treat yesterday - went outside to look around and found a big green walking stick on the side of the house. Then went outside last night with the dog and found another walking stick in our raspberry bushes! Here they are, photographed on my walking stick for Meta purposes only (have to give credit to Mr. BotD for that one ;-)).

The smaller brown one was female and laid half a dozen eggs while I had her in the container. I returned both walking sticks to the woods this morning, now I just need to figure out a safe place for those eggs…

Sorry, but I have to interrupt the BotD requests to show you this awesome beastie&#8230;
It&#8217;s always amazing to find these Brown Hooded Owlet caterpillars (Cucullia convexipennis) on a plant - their bold colors make them look like the cartoon version of a caterpillar.

Sorry, but I have to interrupt the BotD requests to show you this awesome beastie…

It’s always amazing to find these Brown Hooded Owlet caterpillars (Cucullia convexipennis) on a plant - their bold colors make them look like the cartoon version of a caterpillar.

Coworker and I found this ginormous grasshopper sitting in the middle of the road near one of our field sites. We surrounded it in an attempt to capture it, but it outsmarted us by hopping past me into the edge of the woods. Luckily, we found it perched on a dead oak branch, and after I carefully picked up the branch, it posed for a few photos before gleefully hopping away.
This is genus Melanoplus, possibly M. differentialis (Differential Grasshopper) but I really have no right diving into this genus so I&#8217;m probably wrong on the species id.
This is per request for akatonbo, who is currently stuck on Orthoptera now too. Tis the season! :-)

Coworker and I found this ginormous grasshopper sitting in the middle of the road near one of our field sites. We surrounded it in an attempt to capture it, but it outsmarted us by hopping past me into the edge of the woods. Luckily, we found it perched on a dead oak branch, and after I carefully picked up the branch, it posed for a few photos before gleefully hopping away.

This is genus Melanoplus, possibly M. differentialis (Differential Grasshopper) but I really have no right diving into this genus so I’m probably wrong on the species id.

This is per request for akatonbo, who is currently stuck on Orthoptera now too. Tis the season! :-)

Ok, @dragonheartedpoppy and @themodestnarcissist, here&#8217;s a bumblebee (Bombus sp.) that I found hanging out on my porch screen one night this past May. This should be good for @dimespin too, who asked for something Hymenopteran :-).

Ok, @dragonheartedpoppy and @themodestnarcissist, here’s a bumblebee (Bombus sp.) that I found hanging out on my porch screen one night this past May. This should be good for @dimespin too, who asked for something Hymenopteran :-).

Now taking requests

  • Beetle? Moth? Something yellow? Black? Rainbow? I'm taking BotD requests...keep in mind I'm in Massachusetts, not Costa Rica, so supplies are limited
  • ≧◔◡◔≦
Sep 8
I always get a little lazy with the grill cover towards the end of the summer, and it tends to get puddled up with the remnants of whatever thunderstorm is passing through. I make sure to check it every few days for signs of mosquito larvae (and then delight in dumping the water and letting the larvae die :-)), but in this case, I was surprised to discover a pair of backswimmers (Buenoa sp.) swimming around in the tiniest of temporary ponds.

I always get a little lazy with the grill cover towards the end of the summer, and it tends to get puddled up with the remnants of whatever thunderstorm is passing through. I make sure to check it every few days for signs of mosquito larvae (and then delight in dumping the water and letting the larvae die :-)), but in this case, I was surprised to discover a pair of backswimmers (Buenoa sp.) swimming around in the tiniest of temporary ponds.